New Ocean-Monitoring Satellite A Result Of 'Historic' US-Europe Cooperation, Says NASA

New Ocean-Monitoring Satellite A Result Of 'Historic' US-Europe Cooperation, Says NASA

KEY POINTS

  • The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich arrived in California from Munich this weekend
  • The satellite is said to be the result of a "historic U.S.-European partnership"
  • It will monitor the Earth's waters and collect sea level measurements

A new ocean-observing satellite from Europe has finally arrived in the U.S. ahead of its November launch. 

After a two-day journey from Munich, Germany, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite safely arrived at the Vandenberg Air Force Base on Sept. 24 at 1:40 p.m. EDT.

"The spacecraft had a smooth trip from Europe and is in good shape," mission project manager Parag Vaze, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a NASA news release. "Final preparations are underway to see the satellite safely into Earth orbit in a little under seven weeks."

NASA says the satellite, which is named after the former director of NASA's Earth Science Division Dr. Michael Freilich, is the result of a "historic U.S.-European partnership" as it is developed in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA). In another news release, the ESA says the satellite is expected to continue the legacy of the Jason series of satellites.