Here's what King Tut may have eaten when he was alive

Here's what King Tut may have eaten when he was alive

Tut himself was buried with an impressive deli selection, including 100 baskets containing wheat and barley, bread loaves, sycamore figs, dates, melons, and grapes. Also ready and waiting were honey, jars of wine, and four dozen boxes of victual mummies, including "many cuts of beef on the bone, nine ducks, four geese and various small birds." None of the boxes contained fish, despite, or perhaps because of, the fact that it was a common and plentiful food in Tut's time. "Fish are nice, but you don't get them on the offering list because they're not the best food," explained Ikram, noting that pork and mutton were also absent from the eternal picnic; they were "part of the normal diet, but apparently no one could imagine craving them for the rest of time."

According to BBC Dorset, "no recipes from Tutankhamun's time survive," but we can make educated guesses about the cuisine of Ancient Egypt based on pictures found on their walls, as well as the ingredients available in those days. Museum curator Jackie Ridley used this information to recreate ancient Egyptian recipes in her book Tutankhamun's Cook Book. The staple diet relied on "bread, vegetables, fowl and even beer" with richer people, such as pharoahs, enjoying "port, mutton or wine." Ridley says that "Tutankhamun himself would have eaten animals he'd hunted himself, such as ox." Ridley also notes that pomegranate was a common flavoring ingredient that remains popular in modern Middle Eastern cooking today.